Get Adobe Flash player
 

 

on RELATIONSHIP

Describe a healthy relationship in thirty seconds. Why are some relationships so complicated? Wouldn’t life be wonderful if there was no conflict?

 

Is it ever healthy to make a friend feel uncomfortable? Or create a commotion? Or a (temporary) crisis? If relationships usually end gradually then suddenly, what can we ever do to avoid bankruptcy in this most critical arena of life?

 

28) RELATIONSHIP 1.0

Do healthy relationships still have conflict? Why are some relationships complicated and difficult? Why do some people seem to struggle so much in being able to relate well with anyone? What’s required for people from dysfunctional family backgrounds to learn how to relate well with those around them? What better way is there to get answers to these and other questions you’ve had about relationship than in a Scripture-based workshop!

 

29) THE DIALOGUE MIRACLE

Put a healthy dialogue under a microscope and what do you see? You might be surprised. A person given to dialogue sees the one in front of him as a person he can give himself to, not a person he can manipulate. Sometimes our compulsion to be right can keep us from hearing what the other person says, which in many cases may be the truth we really need to hear. You may never think of a dialogue the same way again after this workshop!

 

30) HOW TO LISTEN SO OTHERS WILL TALK

Listening is probably the most neglected and least understood of the communication arts. Those who don’t listen can eventually discover their carelessness has brought them to the edge of disaster. Our ears exist to hear. Listening requires much more than hearing. So, what can be done in a situation where one wants to talk and the other doesn’t? This workshop equally applies to married couples, teammates, friends or even enemies!

 

 

31) HOW TO LOVE PEOPLE

Some people’s persona can be so complex. As you read the descriptions of people on these pages maybe you’re thinking, “I know people who are all of these.” This is common. Narcissism is rampant in our world in many forms. People easily waffle between being a normal sinner, a fool, an evil person or a victim. This workshop applies the wisdom of Scripture to relating to hard-to-live-with people. (The following four workshops represent an expansion of this workshop.)

 

 

32) HOW TO LOVE A NORMAL SINNER

A normal sinner is a decent person who rarely thinks about the realities of living in a fallen world. He struggles to comprehend what it means to live with wisdom in the face of confusion and mystery. He tends to lack the ability to see danger. He is often a fence-sitter, unaware of power dynamics happening all around him. There are appropriate ways to deal with naïve people around us.

 

 

33) HOW TO LOVE A FOOL

There are dangers in labeling people. Not all foolish people do the same thing. A fool is someone who isn’t open to feedback. He finds ways to avoid learning humility by putting the blame back on the victim. He can blow up in anger and afterward wonder why people around him are so slow to forgive and forget. Scripture calls us to use a high degree of wisdom in knowing whether to rebuke or to remain silent. This workshop offers guiding principles on how to pull a fool’s head out of the sand and help him get on a true learning cycle.

 

 

34) HOW TO LOVE AN EVIL PERSON

There’s risk in feeling resolute in our opinion about people. We are never to judge. Sometimes an evil person is an ordinary unassuming person hiding behind a façade of normalcy. Evil is fairly predictable in its efforts to manipulate, mock and shame. The task of loving an evil person (or anyone else) requires supernatural intervention, but there are biblical principles in giving an evil person the gifts of a defeat and an opportunity to repent.

 

 

35) HOW TO LOVE A VICTIM

We live in a fallen world. Everyone experiences hurt and pain. Often when there’s a pattern of abuse or other trauma, this damage or exploitation becomes an integral part of who people believe they are. This victim identity can carry a retaliation impulse that rises to the level of revenge. Victim identity not only worsens abusive relationships, it keeps people stuck in them. “The only way I can feel okay is if you get over your self-centeredness and make me feel okay.” There is a way to love a victim that calls him to start a healing path and learn to face life head on.
 

36) COURAGEOUS CONVERSATION

Have you ever had a conversation with a family member, friend, or co-worker that didn't turn out so well? How do you normally handle a highly charged conversation other than only arguing or resorting to just being “nice”? Difficult talks may not be fun but we must have them if we’re going to treat ourselves and others with respect and walk in truth. Learn the skills of an engaging conversation to pursue the best possible relationship or outcome.

 

 

37) SHARPENING YOUR INTERPERSONAL SKILLS

Experiencing stress in a relationship? Or maybe you would just like to better understand your relationship with your spouse or anyone else for that matter. Here’s a tool that measures nine personality variables or attitudes. Each is paired with it’s opposite, for example, nervous-composed, depressive-lighthearted, dominant-submissive, etc. Take it on yourself and on the other person in criss-cross fashion. The Taylor-Johnson Temperament Analysis test is a very helpful barometer of relationships.

 

 

 

 

38) CARING FOR AGING PARENTS
Your parents aren’t getting any younger. Have you had “The Talk?” How do you balance life with caring for your parents? What kind of living arrangements would your parents prefer when they can no longer take care of themselves? What information do you need to properly guide your parents who seem increasingly dependent on others for basic living assistance? For the largest generation in North American history, questions like these are both common and urgent. You can make informed decisions about caring for your aging parents. From finding good medical care to knowing when and how much to intervene, this workshop is an opportunity to get perspective and answers.